EverythingDog Blog


Watching for the Winners at Westminster, Monday

EverythingDogBlog #26
EverythingDogBlog: Watching for the Winners at Westminster, Monday
By Skye Anderson, MD
The best place for up-to-the-minute dog show information today and tomorrow iswww.westminsterkennelclub.com which has streaming videos all day long. Two other websites,www.dogchannel.com and www.infodog.com, are also sources of great articles and background information.
Today's groups include the hounds, the toy dogs, the herding dogs and the non-sporting dogs. Breed winners will vie for Group Winner (four of them) starting at 8 pm on CNBC.
(Tomorrow's groups include the sporting dogs, the working dogs and the terriers while their breeds will 'compete' for the three group titles beginning at 8 pm tomorrow night on the USA Network, followed by the top seven dogs, all group winners, at approximately 10:30 pm Tuesday.) 
Top dogs, all being shown Tuesday during the day, are said to be the following (champions all):
-German Wirehaired Pointer Mt. View’s Ripsnorter Silver Charm, in the best position, a member of the Sporting Group;
-the number two dog, English Springer Spaniel, Wynmoor Champagne Supernova, also in the Sporting Group;
-Black American Cocker Spaniel Casablanca’s Thrilling Seduction (call name, Beckham) who won the Sporting Group last year;
-Wire Fox Terrier After All Painting The Sky attempting the third leg of dogdom’s triple crown (along with the National Dog Show in November and the AKC Invitational in December) in the Terrier Group; and
-Doberman Pincher Protocol’s Veni Vidi Vici, last year’s Working Group winner, shown by his owner, quite a feat in itself.
Of course, all dog shows are fully capable of being full of suspense and surprises so stay tuned. My eye will also be on my favorites - Labs and Goldens and Aussies and . . . .
(This blog first appeared on 10 Feb 2013.)
(Photo courtesy of Westminster Kennel Club.)

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Cupids and Canines/Clipper Update/Westminster 101

EverythingDogBlog #25
EverythingDogBlog: Cupids and Canines/Clipper Update/Westminster 101, The Spectator’s Guide to America’s Dog Show February 11-12, 2013
By Skye Anderson, MS
Local Event: Cupids and Canines
Come meet more than 15 dog breeds and learn about adopting at Cupids and Canines. Enchanted Forest Shopping Center, Saturday, 11 -2.
Update on Clipper’s Birthday Party
Clipper was the perfect gentleman at Clipper’s Canine Café in Savage Mill, graciously welcoming all the canines who brought their humans to his party though he kept eyeing the food table which held a huge dog cookie in the shape of a bone that tasted like roast beef (so I hear). I bet the young-at-heart 11-year old yellow lab was totally tuckered out that night! Here he is with a birthday cake squeakie a few days ago (see photo).
All About Westminster
A choreography of grapely-purple and sparkly-gold on a backdrop of a rich green carpet. A cacophony of canines amidst a murmuring of voices and sporadic cheering.
And so begins another premier dog show, the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, a February TV tradition, a seemingly out-of-reach dog show but, yes! you CAN walk in off the street and, luck permitting, sit in the first row ringside and theoretically ‘reach out and touch’ the dogs competing in the ring during the day (a faux pas – but you CAN go ‘backstage’ and meet them with their owners’ permission – champions all!) for only $25 a day.
And did you know that the lights of the Empire State Building shine Westminster purple and gold during the Greatest Dog Show on Earth?

You’ve watched it (live breed judging videos available starting Monday and Tuesday on the Westminster website, www.westminsterkennelclub.org) on TV (this year, 8-11pm Monday on CNBC and 8-11pm Tuesday on the USA Network). The website also has the exact time your breed will be competing.
But this year is the year to attend in person. It’s in nearby New York City, so you have no excuse for staying home! Read on for all the information you need to have a grand ol’ time at the show! Then you can always say, “I was there!” - one of approximately 30,000 in-person spectators.
Keep your eyes peeled for Jewel, an American Foxhound, from Mechanicsville (http://www.somdnews.com/article/20121226/NEWS/712269739/1044/jewel-prepares-to-represent-american-foxhounds-at-westminster&template=southernMaryland).

Last year, Palacegarden Malachya 4-year-old Pekingese, was declared America’s Dog, winning over hundreds of dogs in two days. The excitement was electric. Dogs competed first by breed or variety, then the 7 group finals were held in the evening with winners from the daytime breed shows, and the ‘final final’ on Tuesday evening pitted one finalist from each of the 7 groups of dogs (Toy, Terrier, Working, Sporting, Non-Sporting, Herding, and Hounds) ‘against’ the 6 others. Dogs are judged, not against each other, but against the written standard for their breed - from hundreds of dogs whittled down to winners of almost 200 breeds and varieties to winners of 7 groups to the 1 Best in Show.

Who: All the dogs entered are champions as of 31 October. The top five dogs of each breed receive an automatic ‘pre-invite invitation.’ Other champions vie for the remaining hundreds of places by submitting an application during November and December. Highly populated (and popular) breed classes this year will be 61 Goldens, 54 Labs, 50 Ridgebacks, just to mention a few.
The entry fee for dogs is quite affordable but there is no fee for junior handlers to compete although they must accumulate at least 10 wins in qualifying dog shows in the 12 months prior to Halloween and be between 9 and 17 years old  (inclusive) at the time.
Most of the competing dogs are American but 2009 also welcomed champions from England, Germany, Brazil, Thailand, Russia, and Mexico, which is typical. That year also saw about 10% of the entries coming from California with just a few fewer from New York State: again this year, 2013, the states most represented with more than 200 dogs each are California and New York.

What: The 137th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, the second longest-continuously-held sporting event in this country, just one year behind the Kentucky Derby (since 1877 – before even I was born!). A two-day event with 2,721 dogs (2013) in New York City that is televised every year.

Where: Madison Square Garden, New York City (Penn Plaza, 7th and 8th Avenues, 31st to 33rd Streets), across from the Hotel Pennsylvania, is the site for the evening competitions. Reserved seating starts at 110$ for the two-evening event with general admission evening prices at 40$ (nearly the same price as the entry fee for dogs but I’m sure this is merely coincidence). An “Everything” ticket will cost 160$ and includes both days and evenings, while you can get a One-Day Ticket for only 25$.
Note that for the second year in a row, the daytime shows (8:30am-6pm) are at a different location due to Madison Square Garden being renovated even as we speak. The day shows take place at Piers 92/94 on the Hudson (with shuttle buses from the Hotel Pennsylvania)one benefit of this location is that instead of having 8 rings on Monday and 6 rings on Tuesday (for larger dogs), this venue can accommodate up to 12 rings! 
Many dogs and their people stay at the Hotel Pennsylvania directly across the street from the Garden. You WILL want to visit the hotel if only to see the dogs check in on Sunday, but there are other goings-on there to see and do as well (http://finance.yahoo.com/news/yorks-hotel-pennsylvania-unveils-exclusive-143500428.html;_ylt=A2KJ3CfXGgxROwQAcDXQtDMD).

When: February 11 and 12, 2013 (always the week of Valentine’s Day), 8 am to 11 pm. Hounds, Toys, Non-Sporting and Herding dogs (and junior showmanship) will be shown Monday with their group finals Monday night at 8. Dogs are shown simultaneously in each of several rings on the floor during the day. The Sporting, Working, and Terrier Groups are shown Tuesday with their group finals Tuesday night as well as the finals for Best in Show, all beginning at 8 pm, preceded by the Junior Handling Finals from the afternoon sessions. The field is thus narrowed from 2721 entries to one final dog, America's favorite for the year.

You can make a week of it! There are related events starting the previous Friday with dog shows on the weekend, often a reception at the AKC (American Kennel Club) Office Sunday afternoon, awards banquets galore, seminars, and a celebration breakfast the day after, as well as champion tours of the morning TV shows.

Why: Why not? It’s an event to remember. You’ve seen the show on TV, now catch it in person.

How: Take the train for a comfortable, elegant, quiet, unrushed, scenic ride into yesteryear and arrive relaxed. Drive to the Amtrak station near BWI airport and leave your car in the parking garage. Come just for the day or stay for Westminster Week. Call Amtrak at 1-800-AMTRAK or visitwww.amtrak.com for rates and schedules. If your train stops at Penn Station (trains from the south), where Westminster is located, you don’t even have to venture outside for the evening shows! A real bonus during the blizzard of 2006 (more than two feet of snow fell in 12 hours the weekend of Westminster)! Driving may be easier but parking is not. However, you will not need your car in New York City - it is a walking city. And a taxi and subway city.

Details: General admission tickets will cost 25$ (day) or 40$ (evening) for one day ($110 for both evenings) or 160$ for both days and evenings this year (see www.westminsterkennelclub.org for ‘oodles of poodles’ and much more information).
Breeds and Varieties: Some breeds have a class for each variety - color, size (Poodles, Beagles and Schnauzers, e.g.) and coat length. For example, black cocker spaniels are shown in a different class than parti-colored ones with a third cocker class being ASCOB (Any Solid Color Other than Black). On the other hand, black labs and yellow labs and chocolate labs all compete together.

Benched Show
: Westminster is one of the last benched dog shows in America: dogs are required to be 'backstage' in their 'benched' area during the show. You can go backstage and hang out with the dogs; speak with the owners, breeders, and handlers; watch the dogs being groomed; and shop, shop, shop. However, the crowds are similar to the holiday shopping season, winter coats and all. Westminster is for people who thrive on dogs (and crowds backstage). Wear comfortable shoes.

Shopping: Ah, shopping! ‘Backstage’ at Westminster you can find leashes, books, jewelry, new gadgets galore. Across the street from the Garden in the Hotel Pennsylvania and next door are even more vendors with canine first aid kits, T-shirts, artwork and demonstrations of Search and Rescue (SAR) and agility. Plenty to do across the street! You can even mingle in the lobby as ‘dogs and their people’ check in Sunday afternoon at 3pm: meet the hotel’s canine concierge while you are there.

The required Westminster souvenir is the purple and gold guidebook which you can’t do without (for only $20) but you can also pick up a poster (35$), a catalog ($15), notecards ($10) and maybe a print and DVD to watch over and over again. And I happen to have a couple from years past if you want them.

Judging: The Best in Show (BIS) (the champion of champions) judge is selected a couple of years in advance and is sworn to secrecy, his or her name revealed only six months before the show. During the two days of daytime judging, this judge is sequestered so when the finals begin, the BIS judge is as unbiased as possible. And this year, the judge of the Sporting Group, on TV Tuesday evening, is Karen Wilson of nearby Sperryville, VA.

Sensation: Sensation, a Pointer, is the mascot of the Westminster Dog Show who appeared on the cover of the show catalog from 1936 through 1979, replaced by a head study from 1980-1982, and in 1983 a foil embossed version of the full body engraving returned (see photo of Sensation above).

Charities: Veterinary school scholarships are presented Tuesday night and other charities are supported by the Westminster Kennel Club, including the AKC Museum of the Dog, Take The Lead, the Animal Medical Center of NYC, the ASPCA, Angel On A Leash, Greyhound Friends, and Guide Dog Foundation For The Blind. Scholarships are also given to deserving junior handlers. And this year, a special fund has been set up for survivors of Superstorm Sandy.

New Breeds: Two newly recognized dog breeds will be shown for the first time this year: the Russell Terrier (Terrier Group) (see photo) and the Treeing Walker Coonhound (Hound Group).

There is only one Westminster! Be there in person this year! I’ll look for you. Be sure to bring a suitcase big enough to hold all the excitement and take home all your magnetic memories!
(This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on 6 Feb 2013.)
(Photos courtesy of Clipper's Canine Cafe, Westminster Kennel Club and Westminster Kennel Club.)
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Clipper's Birthday Bash and The Magic Pill of Socialization

EverythingDogBlog #24

EverythingDogBlog: Clipper’s Birthday Bash and The Magic Pill - Socialization
By Skye Anderson, MS
Local Event, Sunday
Help celebrate Clipper’s 11th birthday at Clipper’s Canine Café, Savage Mill, Sunday (Clipper’s last day as a 10-year old) from 12-3 pm. The festivities promise to be fun for both canines and their people (bring a camera). Come see a giant roast beef Happy Birthday cookie (for the pooches) – it won’t last long! Refreshments for people, too. 
(Positive) Socialization, the Magic Pill
At a recent dog park meeting, someone mentioned that one benefit of a dog park is to have a place to socialize your dog. That didn’t sit well with me – hence, this article about socialization.
A controversy exists in the world of dog trainers (actually many controversies, but those are topics for another day).
A narrow window of time exists in puppyhood (see photo) to learn to happily accept new people, places and things (think: noun!), and if that developmental window closes without the lesson being learned, the dog can be scarred and scared for life. It is not possible to totally make up all missed opportunities. Many dogs in rescues or shelters appear abused when what actually happened was merely their lost opportunity for socialization.
This window is open between 3 and 12 weeks of age (think: 3 weeks to 3 months). Since you most likely do not acquire your pup until 8 or 9 weeks, you don’t have much time to complete his socialization, plus the fact that the breeder should have already done much of it by taking the pup to the vet, having people in to meet the pups, and so on.
Remember the old wives’ advice not to start training classes for your pup until he is six months old or has completed all his shots? No more! With care, a puppy can successfully take part in training classes at 8 weeks of age or after his first set of shots (if said pup is carried into the facility and the facility is cleaned before class). That old wives’ tale held water when all we had was force-based training and it was thought that an older pup could handle jerks and yanks better than a young pup, but now we have reward-based training methods.
The dog training controversy I mentioned above is simply the definition of the word, socialization. To many dog owners and trainers, it means merely ‘being exposed to.’ To myself and other dog trainers, it means ‘being exposed to and having a HAPPY experience as a result’ or ‘learning to cope well with.’ To be crystal clear, I preface ‘socialization’ with ‘positive’ and therein lays the controversy – do we have to use the word, ‘positive,’ or not? We really shouldn’t have to but I like to err on the side of caution and, to prevent first-time dog owners from misunderstanding, I always say, ‘positive socialization.’
So, go ahead, you can take that adorable little puppy many places with caution - to a parade with all its inherent noise, activity, and people rushing up to pet the puppy, for example (but carry him until he is finished with his shots). However, if the puppy is not comfortable with the cacophony and behaviors constantly expected of him, that is ‘exposure’ rather than ‘socialization.’ To clarify for my clients, I always use the word, ‘positive,’ in front of ‘socialization.’ I want to make having a dog as easy and enjoyable as possible for my clients so I teach ‘positive-socialization.’
Why is this important?
Dr. Lisa Radosta, DVM, DACVB, believes socialization to be the single most important thing that keeps dogs out of the shelter. She calls it the magic pill.
I have heard many Columbians, excited about the new dog park in Harper’s Choice, talk about taking their dog there for socialization and that scares me. If the dog is already socialized, by all means do take him to the dog park for ‘socialization-maintenance.’ But the dog park is a place that your dog will encounter many different dogs and many different people. A dog park is not the best place for initial socialization.
There will be dogs bigger than yours and dogs with a different play style. There will be herding dogs and boxing dogs (like boxers) and mouthy dogs and dogs that do not announce that they are ‘just playing’ when they proceed to ‘chase, catch, bite.’ A dog announces his intention to play, that the next behavior, although a chasing or biting one, is just in play, by offering a playbow (see photo), with the front legs bent to the ground and the butt up in the air. This means that the next actions are not for-real but are offered just for play.
So, perhaps I should have called this, “Socialization-Maintenance at the Dog Park - A Great Benefit!”
(Next week’s blog will be A Watcher’s Guide to Westminster, America’s Dog Show.)
PS – This blog took a bit longer to write since I feel so strongly about socialization that I could write a book – future blogs will also be on socialization.
(This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on 31 Jan 2013.)
(Photos courtesy of DStark.)
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3rd National Train Your Dog Month and more. . . . 

EverythingDogBlog #23
EverythingDogBlog: Comfort Dogs Update, Future Dog Park and Why Should You Train Your Dog?
by Skye Anderson, MS
1. The golden retriever Comfort Dogs from the midwest, including Puppy Isaiah, are still giving to Newtown. See their Facebook page at K-9 Parish Comfort Dogs or visit their webpages atwww.lutheranchurchcharities.org.
2. The Harper’s Choice Dog Park passed another hurdle last week. Hoo-rah! The Village Board recommended the proposed site to the Columbia Association (CA). The Board also recommended 1.) a committee to assist with administration and maintenance and 2.) that CA work with the county on the parking issues.
3. January is the third annual National Train Your Dog Month (www.trainyourdogmonth.com).
Why should you train your dog?
A well-behaved dog is welcome more places. A well-behaved dog greets kids, other dogs and people politely (doesn’t jump up or embarrass anyone); walks nicely on leash (see photo); and comes when you call. A well-behaved dog can go with you to pick up the kids (and their friends) from school or activities. A well-behaved dog can accompany you into retail establishments like hardware stores (call ahead first to see if polite dogs are welcome), pet supply stores, and dog bakeries (like Clipper’s Canine Café in Savage Mill).
A well-trained dog is more confident, less timid and shy. When in doubt, he looks to you for guidance.
Visits to the vet are easier on you and the vet if you have a well-trained, self-assured, polite dog.
You don’t have to worry about a well-trained dog getting into trouble at home or away or at home when you are away.  (Does counter-surfing ring a bell?)
Communication is easier with a well-trained dog. A well-trained dog is more tuned into you and you into him. The bond, the relationship between you and your dog is strong and trusting. You truly have a partnership and a best friend. And so does your dog.
A well-trained dog is a tired dog because training uses both his physical and mental conditioning (he is challenged to think more). A well-trained dog is a pleasure to have: few well-trained dogs end up in shelters or rescues. It has been shown time and again that training is the one most important reason that tends to keep dogs in their ‘furever’ families rather than being surrendered to shelters for simple behavior or training problems. Training could have prevented most of those problems.
And finally, both of you need training! It’s fun! A well-trained dog is a joy to behold indeed.
(This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on 15 Jan 2013.)
(Photo courtesy of SNorrie.)

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Places to Go, Things to Do - Dogwise (More Best Books, Train Your Dog Month, The World of Pets)
EverythingDogBlog #22
EverythingDogBlog: Places to Go, Things to Do, Dogwise
by Skye Anderson, MS
1. DWAA agrees with me! DWAA is the Dog Writers Association of America (www.dwaa.org) which recognizes great dog writers and photographers each February right before the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. This year DWAA agrees with me on four Very Promising Books of 2012 (see last week’s blog). One DVD and two books from my A-List are also finalists for the prestigious Maxwell medallion! I guess great minds really do think alike!
2. January is National Train Your Dog Month, all month long (http://www.trainyourdogmonth.com/) brought to you by the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, a group of more than 6,000 dog trainers (of which I am an active one!). Click on the website for free videos and webinars and training tips, to search for a dog trainer – basically EverythingDog! Check out the calendar for free happenings to help you and your dog become a better team.
3. What are you doing the last weekend in January? Why not take the whole family to the State Fairgrounds in Timonium for the 12th annual World of Pets! (www.worldofpets.org ) It’s like an indoor carnival during the long winter. And the dock diving dogs are back! (see photo)
Are you thinking about getting a dog? (I know the kids are!)Talk to a dog rescue or animal shelter or veterinarian at the World of Pets.
From dogs to cats, ferrets to birds, gerbils to rabbits, guinea pigs to snakes and maybe even a llama!
Educational seminars, shopping for leashes and new products, fabulous food (BBQ, slurpies, cotton candy), entertainment - and all this is indoors!
A cat show and clinic, parade of dog breeds, dogs competing in agility (see photo), bird demonstrations, a petting zoo - even a rainforest exhibit. Learn how to talk to the animals or train a parrot or ask a groomer.
Friday from 2 – 8, Saturday from 10-7 and Sunday from 10-6. Go all three days! Free parking. Adults $10, kids 5-12 $5. Accessible by light rail, too.
Here are some of my great finds from last year’s World of Pets.
1. Thankful Paws, A Foodbank for Pets (www.thankfulpaws.org
What a wonderful, heartwarming idea! Help local homeless people keep their best friends and help veterans across the country pay their veterinarian bills! Thankful Paws wants to help you keep your best friend in these trying times. Please help Thankful Paws by donating leashes, dog toys and food, bowls and blankets – new or slightly used. Thankful Paws is just a year old and a really great idea!
2. HipKlips “Smart, Sleek, Secure”
Need another pocket? HipKlips are the newest, coolest way to NOT carry a purse! The cutest, most secure way to carry dog treats, a poop bag, spare change, keys, a cell phone, whatever.www.hipklips.com A HipKlip is an external pocket that clips to any waistband and even matches your outfit. With two pockets (one open for cell phone and one zippered). I use one of mine as a treat bag - I have three HipKlips! Washable and available – I have one in a snazzy paw print design!
Created on the fly, the first 300 sold out in 2006 at one event; the next 4000 were also handsewn before the owners Allison Carmack and Audra Coldiron realized they had a smash hit on their hands for dog trainers, dog walkers, joggers, beach goers, . . . . .
3. Critter Cozy - Products for the Safety and Well-Being of Your Pet
From the Home Alone Wallet Card/Key Tag to the Cool-It Bandana for your dog, from automobile dog harnesses to The Bottom’s Up Harness for arthritic canines, from seat belts for dog crates to the Safety Turtle swimming pool alarm system for kids and pets, from the ChillyBuddy cooling jacket for humid Maryland summers to non-slip dog socks (PowerPaws) that grip linoleum and hardwood floors to self-inflatable life jackets (Critter’s Inflatable), Critter Cozy’s purpose is to provide products for the safety of our dogs. Thanks, Critter Cozy! (www.crittercozy.com) Safety Turtle (www.safetyturtle.com) ChillyBuddy (photo on http://www.chillybuddy.com/index/cooling.html)
4. 3-D Laser Photo Crystals (www.looxisofvirginia.com)(www.3dphotocrystals.net
A stunning etching embedded in a crystal, set on a lighted stand. Cherished gift for the dog lover! The website doesn’t do it justice.
5. Kajo (www.kajopets.com)
KaJo Pets is a family-run business in Fork, Maryland, with edible frisbees and pizzas for dogs! I love these! Banana pie, anyone? (see photo)
6. Dog Artist Sara England (www.saraenglanddesigns.com)
Whimsical dog artist Sara England from New Market, Maryland, creates delightful dog art prints, coasters, purses and bags, Ts and totes, jewelry and jewelry boxes, glass cheese boards, and suncatchers in all dog breeds - as well as custom works of art starring your dog! Breeds from A to Z (almost), Affenpinscher to Yorkies, at least.
I can’t wait for January 25th! See you there!
(Photos: Dock diving dog makes a splash/Dog agility/Dog treats galore!)


For Your Reading Pleasure: The Best of 2102!
EverythingDogBlog #21
EverythingDogBlog: For Your Reading Pleasure
by Skye Anderson, MS
I read books. I read dog books. I even review dog books. I have, for nearly 10 years now. And I have found that a yellow highlighter is a book reviewer’s best friend (after a dog, of course).
It’s difficult sometimes to place certain books in a certain year. I couldn’t read all the books I needed to before the end of this year, because some of them haven’t trickled down to me yet. And what if a hardback was published in one year but the paperback came out later? It often happens that a book says it is published in one year but Amazon lists it in the following year. And, finally, I naively ignore the publication date until near the end of the year when panic sets in.
So, here is my A-List for 2012 (though my 2011 list is probably more inclusively accurate). And here’s my B-list. And more, including a few I haven’t finished reviewing. In all, each year I read about 50 books of the reviewable kind.  Some I purchase, some are sent to me and some are library books. I have also included the Best Dog Product of the Year which I love! It’s at the end.
The “A” List of Titles I Loved (includes DVDs, and books for the younger set)
(generally available at www.dogwise.com or www.amazon.com or your friendly neighborhood independent bookseller)
The Buddy Files: The Case of the School Ghost (Number 6 in the series), Dori Butler (Whitman, 128 pages, 2010, $14.99HB, $4.99PB, grades 1 and up), wherein a golden retriever plays detective and therapy dog.
Fetching the Perfect Dog Trainer, Katenna Jones (Dogwise, 52 pages, 2012, $9.95), how to select a dog trainer and what do all those initials mean, anyway?
From Tongue to Tail: The Integrated Movement of the Dog, narrated by Andy Mead, BVetMed, MRCVS, and produced by Julia Robertson (Parkes Productions, 48 minutes, 2011, $24.95), for novices and professionals alike. Fascinating slo-mo and illustrations of the bones superimposed on a moving dog. The more I view this DVD, the more I love it. Agility people especially will love it.
Reactive Dog Classes: On the Road to Reality, by Ali Brown (Tanacacia Press, 63 minutes, 2012, $49.95) (videoclip at http://www.dogwise.com/video/video.cfm?itemid=DTB1260). This is the DVD for you if you have or want to help reactive dogs.
Showing Kunga: From Pet Owner to Dog Show Junkie, Alxe Noden (Dogwise, 123 pages, 2012, $12.95), how one woman was bitten by the dog show bug and how she manages to find people to show her how to do it. Funny.
Scooter in the Outside, Anne Bowen (Holiday House, 32 pages, 2012, $16.95, preschool – grade 2), a lovable book with lessons about responsibility and love.
The “B” List (Almost Loved)
Broadway Tails by Bill Berloni and Jim Hanrahan (Lyons Press, 246 pages, 2012, $19.95), wherein a Broadway trainer tells all. If you know Broadway, you’ll like this book. Lots about Annie of Little Orphan Annie.
Dancing Dogs: Stories by Jon Katz (Ballantine Books, 237 pages, 2012, $24), fiction tales by a gifted dog writer of non-fiction.
Dog InSight, Pamela Reid, PhD, CAAB (Dogwise Publishing, 216 pages, 2012, $12.95), a collection of (undated) non-fiction essays by a Canadian who now works for the ASPCA.
Dog is My Copilot: Rescue Tales of Flying Dogs, Second Chances, and the Hero Who Might Live Next Door, by Patrick Regan (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 136 pages, 2012, $16.99), about volunteer pilots who transport dogs to their forever homes.
Dogs of Courage: The Heroism and Heart of Working Dogs Around the World by Lisa Rogak (Thomas Dunne Books, 273 pages, 2012, $14.99), follows the success of Dogs of War.
Picture This by Jacqueline Sheehan (Avon Books, 2012, 400 pp, $14.99 PB), almost-a-romance-novel series.
Plenty in Life is Free: Reflections on Dogs, Training and Grace, Kathy Sdao (Dogwise, 112 pages, 2012, $12.95), telling us it’s OK to sometimes spoil our dogs.
Pure Gold: Adventures with Six Rescued Golden Retrievers, Holli Pfau (Glad Dog Press, 263 pages, 2012, $24.95), a memoir of six goldens in one family.
Unlikely Friendships: For Kids – a new series based on the adult book, Unlikely Friendships, by Jennifer Holland (Workman, 48 pages each, 2012, $7.95, ages 7 and up), follows on the success of the volume for adults. Animals of different species become friends.
Wallace: The Underdog Who Conquered a Sport, Saved a Marriage, and Championed Pit Bulls - One Flying Disc at a Time, by Jim Gorant (Gotham, 2012, $26, 256 pp), one pit bull – from shelter to national dog disc championship.
What the Dog Said by Randi Reisfeld (256 pages, 2012, $16.99, ages 10 and up), a 13-year-old girl raises and trains a service dog after her father’s death on duty as a policeman.
Very Promising (not finished with these yet)
Between Dog and Wolf – Understanding the Connection and the Confusion by Addams and Miller, a Dogwise book.
Facing Farewell: Making the Decision to Euthanize Your Pet by Julie Reck, DVM, a Dogwise book.
I’m a Good Dog: Pit Bulls, America’s Most Beautiful (and Misunderstood) Pet by Ken Foster, whose books are always great.
A Fistful of Collars, The Dog Who Knew Too Much (and A Cat was Involved), by Spencer Quinn. Dog and man detective team from both points of view.
Juvenile Delinquent Dogs, by Sue Brown. How to deal with a canine teenager – or a teenaged canine!
Little Boy Blue, A Puppy’s Rescue from Death Row and His Owner’s Journey for Truth, by Kim Kavin and Jim Gorant (who wrote Lost Dogs, about the Michael Vick dog-fighting ring).
Show Dog: The Charmed Life and Trying Times of a Near-Perfect Purebred by Josh Dean – following a dog for a year, traveling the dog show circuit.
Unsaid. Abramson. Great author.
What’s a Dog For? The Surprising History, Science, Philosophy and Politics of Man’s Best Friend, by John Homans.
Others (unfinished reviews)
Comet’s Tale: How the Dog I Rescued Save My Life. Wolf and Padwa.
A Dog Named Boo: How One Dog and One Woman Rescued Each Other – and the Lives They Transformed Along the Way. Edwards.
Trusting Calvin: How a Dog Helped Heal a Holocaust Survivor’s Heart. Peters.
Uggie, My Story. Uggie.
 New Product of the Year
And my Product of the Year (drumroll, please) is the Soggy Doggy line of towels and mats! Don’t settle for anything with a name that’s close – make sure it’s SoggyDoggy – either a towel with pockets or a mat so soft I was tempted to sleep on it myself at dog camp (could be a crate pad, too). Available at www.dogstuff.comwww.orvis.com, and www.thegreatoutdoors, but make sure it is a Soggy Doggy. And here is a video –scroll down at http://soggydoggydoormat.com/. (http://www.dogstuff.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=1&keyword=soggy+doggy orhttp://www.orvis.com/store/product.aspx?pf_id=5X8H or http://www.thedogoutdoors.com/nsearch.html?query=soggy+doggy&searchsubmit=Go&vwcatalog=yhst-55977610414741&.autodone=http%3A%2F%2F)

I'm a Hero! (the story of a canine blood donor), by Sam, the Great Golden Guest Blogger

EverythingDogBlog #20
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
Does your dog like treats, love and attention? If so, have I got a great deal for you!
Hi! I’m Sam, a Great Golden! My friend, Skye, and I have a strange and wonderful relationship: she’s strange and I’m wonderful!! She picks me up (in her car – I’m kinda big) and takes me strange and wonderful places: to walk around the lake (WOW!), to help her train for the Marine Corps Marathon (FUN RUN!), to visit prospective homes to help place great foster dogs (I check out the people and the place – if I like ‘em, I give ‘em a rating of 5 Paws Up), to the vet (YUCK!), to the Canine Good Citizen evaluation (I passed!), to a handling class and good manners classes (YUCK!) – things like that.
And, Skye also feeds me neat things: homemade chicken and beef flavored dog biscuits for Christmas! WOW! She made SEVEN batches! (I’ll give you the recipe sometime.) But she makes me WORK for my dinner: she hides kibble all over the house when I am outside, then brings me in and I go crazy – what a DELICIOUS smell food is! Although Skye only visits a couple of times a week (she lives a half-hour away) and dog sits me three times a year, I know the sound of her car and all her hiding places for kibble. She also feeds me carrots and peanut butter (low fat – whatever that means) as a treat.
This is a tail-tale of where she took me recently.
I get the whole back seat of Skye’s car (it’s covered with an old sheet – I wonder why). This time we traveled about 45 minutes. Sometimes I look out the window – you can tell which side of the car I look out because I make the window yucky with my nose – it helps me see better! About every 20 minutes, I sit up and wonder where we’re going but then Skye tells me to lie down and the rest of the time I snooze – gotta get my zzzz’s, you know. Gotta rest up for another great adventure! When Skye first started driving me neat places (they call that a chauffeur), she worried about me, so at every red light she would hand back a few kibble bits. I wish she would still worry! Food is SO important to a growing Golden! Even if he is five, like me. I’m all grown up, now I’m growing out!
So we arrived and got out of the car. Skye always lets me sniff around a bit and smell the flowers – well, sniff the trees and bushes and telephone poles, anyway – you know why! Gotta find out who’s been there! And leave my own calling card. And there were a lot of good dog smells. I found out a little female Bichon pupster had been there and even recognized Old Charlie’s scent!
Then we went into this building and sat down. We looked at all the dog pictures on the wall. A little (I call all humans ‘little’) boy came out to the waiting room to get us and took us to a tiny room – but, guess what! I smelled dog biscuits all over! On the floor I found a few and gobbled them up. They also had water for me. I knew there were biscuits on the counter but they were watching me so I couldn’t get them – had to be good. Tail waggin’ time! There was this funny table that had biscuits on it (I smelled ‘em) and a pillow and after a few minutes, another little girl came in and both little people lifted me to the table and felt me all over – felt good!
Then the little boy, the technician, lay down on the table with me so I could put my head on his arm and he put his leg over me so I felt real cozy and snoozy. The vet girl talked to me the whole time – I like her! She has red hair, just like me. (Well, I’m more butterscotch.) Wonder what she said. . . .
Then the vet girl made a buzzing sound with her mouth and turned on a funny machine and shaved a quarter-sized area of my neck (Skye couldn’t find it later – I have my winter coat on). Then the vet girl stuck a needle in my neck (my jugular vein). The boy and girl kept talking to me the whole time (telling me how great I am, I suppose) and feeding me dog biscuits and I felt so great and loved! I knew Skye was still in the room but she was behind me so I couldn’t see her but I would've had a super time with the two little people even without Skye. (Don’t tell Skye, OK?)
It only took about 10-20 minutes. Then the noise stopped, the vet girl took the needle out and rubbed my neck. That felt so great! I hope Skye was learning about that place! Then the two little people lifted me down to the floor and I got to hunt for more dog biscuits.
Then they tied on a red bandana (see Lucy’s photo) that said I was a hero. I can’t wait to go back!
You too can be a hero. If you are at least 9 months old and weigh 35 pounds or more, have your human call the BRVBB*, the Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank, at 540-338-7387 or have your human go to that funny box and type www.brvbblifesavers.com to “READ ALL ABOUT IT!” It’s fun!
Besides my red bandana that tells everyone I’m a Life Saver (butterscotch flavor, here, please), I hope they soon have bumper stickers so people will know to be careful when I’m in Skye’s car (cuz I AM special).
I can’t wait to go again and get more freebie-treats and hugs (you know, a great dog can never get too many treats!) And they will check me out every time and do my annual blood work. I get a free unit of blood for every one I give after a year, if I ever need it, and I’m helping my buddies who suffer from anemia, injury or disease. I feel SO good! They tell me I’m a HERO! I know I’m a LIFE SAVER! I wear my bandana whenever I can – even to camp! Even to that dog place to get my picture taken with that fat guy in the red suit who laughed so much. The BRVBB will also have an information table at the World of Pets (www.worldofpets.org) at the Maryland state fairgrounds in Timonium the last weekend in January! See you there for lots of great dog stuff and fun!
Just do it! They’ll treat you great and give you great treats! Just tell ‘em Sam sent you! They’ll know me. I’m the butterscotch dog.
*Donor sites in MD, VA, and WV with distribution centers all over the country!
(Photos: Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank/Lucy is proud to wear her hero bandana/Give a second chance. Give blood - credit: BRVBB)


Not Just for Christmas: A dog is not just for Christmas. A dog is for life!

EverythingDogBlog #19



EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
(This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on December 10, 2012.)
A dog is not just for Christmas, a dog is for life! Think 10-20 years down the road and please think twice about getting a puppy for Christmas. A stuffed dog would be better (we call them ‘stuffies’). You could also gift a new leash, water bowl, collar, ID, some books and DVDs, and toys for your future canine.
The holidays are a hectic time. Shopping, wrapping presents, dinner parties, indoor pine trees, tinsel, poinsettias, tree ornaments, on-tree lights, wrapping paper, ivy, chocolate, guests, drinks, rich food, loud noises, strangers, late nights and late mornings. All these are things that may not be dog-friendly, especially for new dogs who need a settling-in period and an escape place.
Dogs may get a lot of attention during the holidays when the kids are home but what about when they go back to school and the dog is abruptly left 'home alone' for several hours, day after day? Suddenly deserted. And the kids have after-school and evening activities. What’s a dog to do (except get into trouble)?
Have you ever tried to housetrain a puppy when it is 5 degrees above zero outside? Of course, you want to accompany your pup outside so you know when he is successful so you can reward him - wouldn’t it be easier to get a pup in the spring or summer?
I made a mistake once - in 1967. My highschool sports team went to the shelter and got a dog for our coach. It’s hard to believe now, but, hopefully most people know better today in 2012. Don’t give a living gift to another person, especially if they are just recovering from a pet’s recent death. When they are ready is when you want to be there to help. That’s the value of stuffies (and leash gifts).
Of course, if you live alone and have a week or two off from work or if you are a senior couple, a new animal might be just right for you.
But for the most part, wouldn’t it be better to wait until spring break or summer to add a new member to the family when you have more time to set up a successful routine and canine home? Think about it, then think about it again.
Photos: I'm Not Just for Christmas (DStark)/No Puppies this Christmas! (Dogster.com)/Come January . . . . (Janice - mail@missyredboots.com)/A Puppy is Not a Present (Dogster.com)


Dog Doings During December
EverythingDogBlog #18

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on December 5, 2012. 

What to do for and with your dog during December!

(Tail Lights at Symphony of Lights)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
Dog Doings for December (with updates)
Updates
  1. Dogs who successfully completed the recent AKC (American Kennel Club) Canine Good Citizen evaluation include Cody, Condi and Muffin. Congratulations on being good members of the community and on your good canine manners!
  2. Local shelter wins big in ASPCA Rachel Ray $100,00 Adoption Challenge! (see previous blogs for more information) Friday, the results were announced - BARCS, the largest companion animal shelter in Maryland placed first in the NorthEast Division for adopting out more dogs and cats in August – October this year over last year’s numbers. BARCS in Baltimore adopted out 679 pets, an increase of 49% over last year. For their efforts, they won a $20,000 grant plus $10,00 for Most Improved Shelter! (http://news.yahoo.com/more-56-000-pets-saved-during-2012-aspca-181643969.html) More than 50 shelters took part over 91 days and saved 56,232 animals (14,376 more than this period last year).

Doings
December 2 – Oops! Too late on this one for 2012. Sunday was National Mutt Day (www.nationalmuttday.com). Put it on your calendar for next year.
December 4 - Attend the new Harper’s Choice Dog Park information meeting this Tuesday in Kahler Hall from 7-9pm and find out what’s in store and when for our dogs to play at the park.
December 11 - Don’t forget to take your dog to Tail Lights on Tuesday, 11 December, from 4:30 – 5:45 (last admission at 5:15 pm) – a 1.4 mile walk through the Symphony of Lights with your best friend! Dogs free, humans $10. Just show up or register online athttp://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/howard_county_general_hospital/ways_give/howard_hospital_foundation/foundation_events/symphony_of_lights/tail_lights.html


Park Your Dog Here in Columbia
EverythingDogBlog #17

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on November 29, 2012. 

More Dog Parks in Howard County? One here, one approved, one not, and then one more! Yippy skippy! The power of the public talking to our government!

EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
What is a Dog Park, Anyway?
A good first source to turn to is Wikipedia: A facility set aside for dogs to exercise and play off-leash in a controlled environment under the supervision of their owners. The word, supervision, is crucial because many dog owners are not aware of canine body language and stress signals. For that reason, dog parks may not be the best choice for all dogs.
Laurel Allen wrote her Master’s thesis at the University of Pennsylvania on dog parks which is a fairly comprehensive treatment of the subject and compares six dog parks on the east coast. (http://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1017&context=mes_capstones)
One Here
Howard County currently has only one dog park, an off-leash area in Worthington Park, Ellicott City (http://www.howardcountymd.gov/Departments.aspx?id=1917), that was two years in the planning and opened 10 years ago. There have been no complaints in the past 9 years. Yippy skippy! An application and Tips and Guidelines can be found athttp://www.howardcountymd.gov/Departments.aspx?id=4294969816.
One Approved
On November 14, the Howard County Recreation and Parks Advisory Board approved a dog park/off-leash area in Blandair Regional Park, a ‘to-be-finished’ 300-acre park on 175 near Tamar between 29 and I-95. Two-thirds of the park will be north of 175 with the dog park located on the smaller south side (overpasses will convey cars from one section to the other over 175). (http://countyofhowardmd.us/blandairdogpark.htm)
The dog park is part of Phase 3 and is slated to open in 2013-14. The best map can be viewed athttp://www.howardcountymd.gov/uploadedFiles/Home/Department_Content_%28PDF_and_HTML%29/Recreation_and_Parks/All_PDFs/BlandairDog.pdf- note that the dog park has been approved for Area 3 and has been in the planning for about 10 years. That is a whole generation in dog years!
Our Government Listens. . . .
Prior to a May meeting, emails were greatly in favor of the Blandair dog park (28 For, 3 Against). At the meeting, a poll of the audience revealed 19 For and 8 Against, while the weeks that followed resulted in 113 emails For and 10 Against - a grand total of 160 For and 21 Against (though some may have been counted more than once). Our government listened to the people (and their dogs). Yippy skippy!
One Not
The village of Hickory Ridge surveyed 130 residents and found that 33% wanted a gathering place; 26%, a dog park; 10%, a community center; 9%, an outdoor exercise facility; and 6%, a play field or playground (13% preferred “Other”). The Village Board/Columbia Association decided against supporting a dog park in Hickory Ridge but approved a nearby location in Harper’s Choice.
One More – Come to the Meeting!
The Columbia Association (CA) has approved and in February will begin planning a dog park in Harper’s Choice. Money has been set aside: $10,000 for the plans and $80,000 for construction. CA will present the plans at a public meeting on December 4 from 7-9 pm at Kahler Hall with Mary Kay Sigaty, the District 4 representative on the Howard County Council in attendance.
Major considerations in approving a dog park are generally proximity to residences, parking, and accessibility. The approximately 90,000 residents of Columbia value the amenities of the Columbia Association and many residents are members of dog families. See the photos of dogs in typical dog parks in this blog.
And see you at the meeting! And at the dog parks! Yippy skippy!
For background information, Baltimore Sun articles from May, July and November:http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/howard/publications/columbia-flier/ph-ho-cf-dog-park-0524-20120518,0,3075994.story           
PS – as a dog book reviewer for the past 10 years, the best book on dog parks that I have come across is Visiting the Dog Park: Having Fun, Staying Safe by Cheryl Smith (2007, $11.95, 128 pp) (see photo) available at www.dogwise.com
(Photos courtesy of DStark)


Is Your Canine a Good Citizen?
EverythingDogBlog #16

 This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on November 20, 2012.

(Dog-Walking through Tail Lights - credit vfetrow)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
Is Your Canine a Good Citizen?
Does your dog have good manners at home and in the community?
A well-behaved dog is one who can accompany you to public places and events like dog walks, walks around Lake Elkhorn or Centennial Lake, walks around the neighborhood at times other than midnight, and maybe even the Symphony of Lights (Tail Lights*) on December 11 - perhaps sit with you on the sidelines of your child’s soccer game!
We all want a best friend like that. And sometimes having a good canine citizen may allow you to rent an apartment that would otherwise exclude your dog. I recently found out that some apartments in Columbia have breed-specific exclusions (EverythibgDogBlog will report on that topic in a future blog, along with various home-owners’ and renters’ insurance policies).
The American Kennel Club’s rapidly growing Canine Good Citizen (CGC) program is a certification designed to evaluate your dog’s manners. You and your dog can be evaluated even if you two haven’t taken any formal dog training or CGC classes. The evaluation takes about 10-15 minutes.
Before taking the Canine Good Citizen ‘test,’ you will sign the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge because responsible dog ownership is a key part of the CGC concept and by signing the pledge, you agree to take care of your dog's health needs, safety, exercise, training and quality of life. You also agree to show responsibility by cleaning up after your dog in public places and never letting your dog infringe on the rights of others.
Items on the CGC evaluation include Accepting a friendly stranger, Sitting politely for petting, Appearance and grooming, Walking on a loose leash and through a crowd, Sit, Down, Stay, Come when called, Reaction to another dog and to distractions, and Supervised separation. You can view a video of the evaluation at http://caninegoodcitizen.wordpress.com/2012/02/13/cgc-video-a-model-test/.
Beginning in January, the CGC becomes a title that you can put after your dog’s name! How cool is that!
For more information about the program and evaluation, check outhttp://www.akc.org/dogowner/training/canine_good_citizen/index.cfm or contact me, Skye Anderson. I am a CGC Evaluator and will be evaluating dogs and their people over Thanksgiving weekend. I am also available to evaluate at dog clubs, rescues, 4H and other groups.     
------------------
*Tail Lights - Tuesday, December 11 / 4:30 - 5:45 p.m. Treat yourself and your dog to a walk through the 1.4 mile Symphony of Lights displays, benefitting Howard County General Hospital. It’s a wonderful way to enjoy the holiday season and to make this dog-friendly walk your family’s new holiday tradition. More on this event in a future blog.ghts. (http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/howard_county_general_hospital/ways_give/howard_hospital_foundation/foundation_events/symphony_of_lights/tail_lights.html)


County Canine Calendar for November - Kathy is coming to Columbia! (and other dog events)
EverythingDogBlog #15

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on November 7, 2012. 

EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
1. November 6-8, Tuesday through Thursday - The First Annual Pet Boarding and Daycare Expo (http://www.barkleigh.com/pbd/expo.html) at the Sheraton Baltimore North (903 Dulaney Valley Road). The tradeshow is Wednesday and Thursday (10$ admission) with all the latest kennel equipment, and seminars Tuesday through Thursday. This is for you if you are interested in starting a dog day care or take your dog to day care and want to see what’s new and what you should expect. Barkleigh always puts on quality conferences!
2. Sunday, November 11 – free screening of the HBO documentary, “Madonna of the Mills: The Truth about Puppy Mills,” about the Pennsylvania puppy mills (www.madonnaofthemills.com).
Price: free but must RSVP at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/287635  
Time: 5-7 pm (includes discussion)
Location: Busboy and Poets Restaurant, 5331 Baltimore Ave, Hyattsville, MD 20781 (across the street from The Big Bad Woof, a pet supply store well worth the trip! www.thebigbadwoof.com)
3. Saturday and Sunday, November 17 and 18, improve your dog training!
Kathy Sdao is coming back to Columbia for a wild, wooly, wonderful weekend of dogs!
“Improve your ‘I-Cue’: Learn the Science of Signals” (http://dogsofcourse.com/seminarinfo.php?id=6) is for trainers and dogs as well as serious dog-people who just may experience a life-changing weekend! (see Dogs of Course logo)
Working dog spots filled up quickly but there is still room for auditos ("lab" assistants) who attend without dogs yet have the opportunity to assist the human-dog teams.
Kathy is an inspiring, talented and very very funny presenter who lectures worldwide (Italy, Denmark and Belgium this year) and is much in demand. She uses a combination of lecture, video and working exercises with your dog. Ask her about the pineapple!
Kathy (www.kathysdao.com) is one of only about 50 Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (Associate) in the US and recently wrote Plenty in Life is Free: Reflections on Dogs, Training and Finding Grace, available at http://www.dogwise.com/itemdetails.cfm?ID=DTB1246 (see photo). CEUs are available.
Kathy is on the Yahoo! List, DogRead, for the first half of the month if you want to email her personally and discuss her book.
Time: 9-5, both days (you may attend for only one day, if you wish)
Information and to register: http://dogsofcourse.com/seminarinfo.php?id=6
Why attend? We want compliance. We want our dog to respond to “commands” accurately and quickly. People often attribute a dog’s failure to do this to dominance, stupidity or stubbornness but it’s more likely that these mistakes result from confusion (or insufficient motivation). Your dog simply doesn’t know what you want because your cues or signals are unfamiliar, inconsistent or unclear.
Understanding the basics of cueing will help you improve how you choose, add, change and maintain cues. You will be able to minimize the amount of static in the signals you send your dog, providing a clearer channel of communication and better compliance!
4. Thanksgiving Weekend (Friday, Saturday and Sunday, November 23-25)
What are you doing after Thanksgiving to avoid the shopping rush?
Why not attend a dog cluster, specifically the Maryland Turkey Cluster for dogs – three days of separate dog shows (indoor conformation and outdoor obedience) at the Howard County Fairgrounds (cost: $5 for parking). No pet dogs or strollers, please.
Meet 150 breeds, 1500-2400 dogs each day, 50 vendors selling dog-related products (toys, treats, leashes, books galore). And, of course, hot dogs and popcorn and cotton candy and . . . . !
(Dog shows are held at the Fairgrounds several times a year.)
Time: 8-6
Location: Howard County Fairgrounds, just off Route 70 on the way to Mt. Airy (410-442-1022)http://howardcountyfair.com/calendar

Great learning about dogs!

(Photos courtesy www.DogsOfCourse.com and www.Dogwise.com)




"Dog Shelter" Takes on New Meaning During Sandy
EverythingDogBlog #14

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on November 1, 2012.

Dog-friendly evacuation shelters are on the rise and thank goodness!

Every 
(Hope you had a Happy Halloween Snuffy, and were careful with knives!)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson
Snuffy-the-dog, along with his owner, spent Sandy in our Howard County, Maryland, shelter at the Bain Center, though he was crated in a separate room from the dozen or so people also taking shelter there, according to Kevin Enright of the Howard County Government.
Fortunately, this was also the case in many localities up and down the East Coast: in Maryland, Anne Arundel county provided one pet friendly shelter; Baltimore City, 6; Baltimore County, 2; Montgomery County, 1; Prince George’s County, 1; Wicomico, 1; Worcester, 1; and Animal Control housed pets in Queen Anne’s County.
According to the Mayor’s Alliance for New York City's Animals, under New York City law, during times of evacuation, a cab driver may not turn down a fare who is bringing a pet along. In addition, an evacuation center must accept any pet as long as he/she is accompanied by a human and either leashed or in a carrier.
Now that our most difficult times are over in Maryland, it is a good time to plan for future contingencies by reading an excellent article, What to Expect at an Animal Evacuation Shelter (http://www.examiner.com/article/what-to-expect-at-an-animal-evacuation-shelter ).
Be Prepared
Bring your dog’s crate, plenty of dog food, two leashes, several days' worth of medications, medical and shot records (or your dog may have to be revaccinated), your identification and information for an alternate caregiver, a photo of your dog with your family, his tags, a dog first aid kit (to share), your veterinarian’s contact information, food and water bowls, toys, blankets, poop bags.
You may have to fill out paperwork so be sure to read it carefully, even the fine print. And if you sign anything, ask for a copy.
Most likely, the dogs will be housed in a separate room or location but you will probably be able to visit.
Be Considerate, Be thankful
Don’t expect to get your crate or dog bowls back but be pleasantly surprised if you do. Expect the dog food you bring to be mixed in with other dog food to make feeding easier and quicker for the staff.
And finally, your best friend may be cared for by volunteers or animal control/shelter employees who may not be getting paid. Thank them and then thank them again. Offer to help.
And last of all, relax - a little. Fido will be one less thing to worry about!
Oh, and, by the way, Snuffy, Zuma hopes you had a safe Halloween!
(Photo courtesy DStark)



Three Things to do for Dogs NOW!
EverythingDogBlog #13

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on October 24, 2012.

1. Remember to order your golden retriever calendar, The Sashettes of 2013, and help raise funds for canine cancer. The Sashettes are a litter of 11 golden retrievers born in 2003 who star in their own calendar each year. Become a ‘Sashette groupie’ like me (I have the entire set of calendars) by sending a check for $20.00 (plus $5 P&H) to Carol Taylor, 115 Riparian Drive, Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368 or by pre-ordering via PayPal at beadsnglitz@gmail.com (add $2.00 for PayPal charges to the cost of the calendar plus P&H). Deadline is Halloween.
For a sneak preview of this collectible 2013 Sashette calendar, click onhttp://lazyriver.smugmug.com/SashetteCalendars/Sashette-Calendar-2013/2 .
2. This is the last weekend to help BARCS (the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter) win the Rachel Ray/APSCA Shelter Challenge for $100,000.
Animal adoption fees are waived through the end of the month (that’s through next Wednesday).
See EverythingDogBlog for 16 October for more information and for BARCS’ phone number, hours, website and address (and to see adorable pit bulls Stella and Jethro adopted from BARCS by Chi Omega alums!): http://columbia.patch.com/blog_posts/everythingdogblog-rachel-ray-and-the-aspca-give-barcs-a-chance.
PS – Support the ASPCA (especially if you like orange!) by visiting their online store and take advantage of the 20% OFF sale! (October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month -http://www.aspcaonlinestore.com/)
3. Celebrate National Pit Bull Awareness this weekend!
“Bless the Bullies”    “My Pit Bull is Family”    “Pit Bulls Deserve Their Day in the Sun”
National Pit Bull Awareness events will be held across the nation (including Baltimore) and in Canada this weekend, but not in Denver, where three dog breeds commonly known as pit bulls have been banned since 1989 (http://www.examiner.com/article/pit-bull-awareness-day-will-feature-silent-tribute-to-dogs-killed-denver). Denver has euthanized more than 6000 of these dogs as a result and for no reason other than how they look.
Such Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) and is out-and-out discrimination based on a dog’s genes and appearance.
Don’t forget that the winner of the Best in Show at Westminster (and on TV) in 2005 was (colored) bull terrier Rufus (bull terriers are often one of the 5 or 6 breeds lumped together as pit bulls).
Meet Snorkle, a canine blood donor, Rally champion, and agility dog (see photos by DMatteson) who hails from Ellicott City.
Meet Ruby-doo (see photo by PHouliaras), sports fan extraordinaire who helps BARCS, too (https://www.facebook.com/RubyPitBull)!
Saturday, help celebrate Community Pit Bull Day by joining in on the fun at Armistead Gardens Elementary School (5001 E Eager St, Baltimore [northeast]) starting at noon – free and low-cost vaccines and spay/neuter signup, leash and collar exchange for pits and pit mixes, ask-the-trainer, dog safety information for children and legal resource information for concerned residents.
On Sunday, have more fun with great pit bulls at Pit Bulls on Parade at Rash Field, the Inner Harbor, starting at 11 am. For more information: b_moredog@yahoo.com or www.bmoredog.org (e.g., for videos of agility pitties in action).
After all, Pit Bulls are Family, Too!

(Photos courtesy of DMatteson, DMatteson and PHouliaras)


(Stella and Jethro After a Hard Day of Play - credit ERosen/Jethro and his Peeps - credit M Stavrinos)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
October is 'Adopt a Shelter Dog' Month
For the third year in a row, the ASPCA and animal lover Rachel Ray have challenged animal shelters across the country to create new programs and adopt out more animals then the previous year.
BARCS, the Baltimore Animal and Rescue Center and Shelter, is rising to the occasion. Beginning in August and through the end of this month, BARCS is waiving adoption fees! This means that more people can adopt a best friend, more animals will find a new forever home, and more of Baltimore will be happy!
Contest rules differ for each shelter based upon size: BARCS needs to adopt out 1679 animals in the three-month period from August through October, at least 300 more than last year. They can do it with your help!
Two-thirds of the way through the contest period, at the end of September, BARCS was in second place in the NorthEast Region and very very close behind the first place shelter.
Let’s help BARCS win the $100,000 challenge they so deserve. Let’s help more deserving animals find new homes. Together we can do it!
Additional prizes include $5,000 for adopting out more than 300 animals in the time frame: BARCS is a shoe-in for this one.
BARCS, An Oasis in Downtown Baltimore
I had tried to find BARCS numerous times when I drove into Baltimore on business – looked it up on maps and still had trouble. When I finally found the shelter, I thought, “What is an animal shelter doing in an industrial part of town by the stadiums, the freeways, the water?”
But, I found an oasis in the middle of urbanity and, as I drove in, I immediately felt calmed and pleasantly excited! All the shelter workers and volunteers were helpful, cheerful, and happy to be there. Wow! Lucky dogs and cats!
Lucky Local Chi Omega Alums Adopt Dogs and Adopt BARCS
Alumnae of the Chi Omega Women’s College Fraternity, Greater Baltimore Chapter, held their first annual “Fur-raiser” for BARCS at a September barbeque, collecting towels, toys, balls, treats, collars and more – for the very deserving dogs at BARCS. Two alums had recently adopted BARCS dogs (see photo of best friends Stella and Jethro after a hard day of play, courtesy E Roser).
Jethro, finally with his forever-family after being rescued by BARCS, wants to become a therapy dog when he grows up: he is currently a star student in training class and certainly a handsome fella (photos of Jethro with his ‘peeps’ [people], courtesy M Stavrinos).
Jethro loves long walks (or runs) in the park and playing with his furry friends. His favorite treat is that fluffy white stuff he finds inside his toys, as well as anything that smells like peanut butter. (Sound familiar?)
If you would like a best friend like Jethro or Stella, hop on down to BARCS this month!
Running with the Dogs
And run with BARCS in a Charn City Run this Saturday, October 20th, at Patterson Park in the first “Ready, Set, Sniff” 5K Run or Walk With Your Dog at BARCStober Fest. The fun starts near the Pagoda at 11 am with activities galore for both humans and dogs. For complete information, see http://www.charmcityrun.com/page.cfm?pageid=33&eid=1118.
_____________________________________________________ 
BARCS is located at 301 Stockholm St, Baltimore, MD 21230
410-396-4695, Hours: Monday – Friday 2-6 pm, Weekends 11 am - 4 pm


EverythingDogBlog #11
This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com, October 8, 2012.     
(Cover Girl Sasha on the cover of the 2012 Sashette Calendar)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson
“Together we can make a difference, one paw print at a time”
It was a very long day and a very tiring night - November 21, 2003 - and a cold one to boot, when a lively litter of 11 golden retriever puppies were born in a small town in Quebec, Canada, to MBISS Can/BIS Bda/Am CH Lazyriver Sweet Sasha OD, SDHF, CGC, TDI.
Sasha (1998-2011) was one lucky, lovely golden retriever mother.  
The Sashettes, as they have come to be known, have been immortalized with their own calendar, raising funds for The Goldstock Fund (www.goldstockfund.org) based in California and the award-winning Smiling Blue Skies Cancer Fund (www.smilingblueskies.org) in Canada.
The Goldstock Fund provides monetary assistance with transport, boarding, behavioral evaluations, and medical costs associated with rescuing Goldens and golden-hearted dogs. The Smiling Blue Skies Cancer Fund (“If hope was a medicine, Love would surely be the cure”) helps with canine cancer research, education and training; a canine registry; and support for families of dogs with cancer. More than a million dollars has been raised so far.
The Sashette calendar for 2012 (see photo of Sasha who is on the cover) has been nominated for the Dog Writers Association of America’s (DWAA) prestigious Maxwell Award. Finalists will be announced in December with the award presented at the annual DWAA banquet the day before the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show begins in New York City. This time the banquet falls on Sunday, February 10, 2013.
You have until the end of October to pre-order your 2013 Sashette calendar so don’t delay! (details at the end of this article)
Sashettes currently live in Quebec, Ontario, and New Brunswick, Canada, as well as California, New Jersey, New York, and Colorado.
Some of them even manage to get together for an almost–entire family reunion of play, play and more play whenever they can, usually at dog shows and dog camps in Canada, Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire.
As you can see on any of the calendars, Sashettes have excelled in ‘all things dog’ – from conformation (four Canadian Champions, Puppy Best in Shows and Specialty Shows), to obedience champions, agility, and rally champions, and most have also gone on to careers as Canine Good Citizens and certified therapy dogs. They truly have followed in their mother’s footsteps – Sweet Sasha was an American Champion, Bermuda Best in Show, and Canadian Best in Specialty Show (multiple times). She was inducted into the Show Dog Hall of Fame and even made the cut at Westminster!
Now you, too, can own your very own Sashette calendar and become a ‘Sashette groupie’ like me (I have the whole set) by sending a check for $20.00 (plus $5 P&H) to Carol Taylor, 115 Riparian Drive, Dardenne Prairie, MO 63368 or by pre-ordering via PayPal at beadsnglitz@gmail.com (add $2.00 for PayPal charges to the cost of the calendar plus P&H).

(Photo courtesy of SNorrie)


What a Marine Sniper/Medal of Honor Winner Reminded Me About Dogs: People have to be taught what dogs know naturally
EverythingDogBlog #10
This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on October 3, 2012.

EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
“Scan your sector!” comes the command from the tower at the range, initiating a round of aiming at the targets quickly and accurately as they pop up at different distances and in different locations for different amounts of time (unless you shoot them down). . . .
Sgt (then Cpl) Dakota Meyer is the newest recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions on one day in 2009 during the Battle of Gangigal in Afghanistan. He has recently authored, along with the prolific Bing West, a riveting book, Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War, in which he also details his training as a Marine sniper.
Many military members laud the extensive education, training, and experience they receive in the military.
Contrary to popular perception, only a minority of a sniper’s job concerns shooting – the majority of his job is preparing to shoot, which includes planning the patrol or convoy or recon mission.
Meyer’s trainers emphasized attention to detail and situational awareness (SA), being aware of what is going on around you – ALL around you (even behind you), especially that which is out of the ordinary.
Classes in personal safety also emphasize situational awareness because preventing a confrontation is so much easier and safer than overcoming an attacker.
Scanning your sector, part of situational awareness, is accomplished almost automatically after a while. You learn to notice that which is out of place or seems out of place. In Afghanistan this could be the absence of children and women on a village street or it could be the presence of one person who seems to be loitering outside a NATO base.
When watching a dog gait, most of what the judge sees is superb but even a seemingly insignificant flaw will attract his attention and draw his eye like a magnet. This may be a slight limp or a tail movement that is not symmetrical in both directions. Dog show judges train themselves to look for these inconsistencies that are out-of-the-ordinary, just as soldiers and marines do.
As a canine massage practitioner, I was trained to observe a dog’s gait: I watch the dog exit the car and walk on the grass or driveway (preferred surface) to the appointment. When I notice something out of the ordinary, I know to devote attention to that spot during the session.
So, a marine sniper, a dog show judge and a canine massage practitioner, as well as veterinarians, look for what they expect not to see, for that gives them information about where to be cautious.
A marine sniper, a dog show judge, a canine massage practitioner, and a veterinarian have to learn this skill while Fido knows it instinctively.
Dogs see well in low light (at night, dawn and dusk), better than we do but dogs see colors less well (fewer cones than rods in their eyes). Dogs are also more attracted to movement: they may not see someone standing in the park 300 meters away UNTIL he moves. Dogs ‘scan their sector’ and focus in on movement – that which is sudden and out of the ordinary. We, on the other hand, see objects better that stand out (different color, e.g.) from the background and have to learn to scan our sector.
Dogs have a lot to teach us. What has your dog taught you lately?


EverythingDogBlog #10
This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on October 3, 2012.

EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
“Scan your sector!” comes the command from the tower at the range, initiating a round of aiming at the targets quickly and accurately as they pop up at different distances and in different locations for different amounts of time (unless you shoot them down). . . .
Sgt (then Cpl) Dakota Meyer is the newest recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions on one day in 2009 during the Battle of Gangigal in Afghanistan. He has recently authored, along with the prolific Bing West, a riveting book, Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War, in which he also details his training as a Marine sniper.
Many military members laud the extensive education, training, and experience they receive in the military.
Contrary to popular perception, only a minority of a sniper’s job concerns shooting – the majority of his job is preparing to shoot, which includes planning the patrol or convoy or recon mission.
Meyer’s trainers emphasized attention to detail and situational awareness (SA), being aware of what is going on around you – ALL around you (even behind you), especially that which is out of the ordinary.
Classes in personal safety also emphasize situational awareness because preventing a confrontation is so much easier and safer than overcoming an attacker.
Scanning your sector, part of situational awareness, is accomplished almost automatically after a while. You learn to notice that which is out of place or seems out of place. In Afghanistan this could be the absence of children and women on a village street or it could be the presence of one person who seems to be loitering outside a NATO base.
When watching a dog gait, most of what the judge sees is superb but even a seemingly insignificant flaw will attract his attention and draw his eye like a magnet. This may be a slight limp or a tail movement that is not symmetrical in both directions. Dog show judges train themselves to look for these inconsistencies that are out-of-the-ordinary, just as soldiers and marines do.
As a canine massage practitioner, I was trained to observe a dog’s gait: I watch the dog exit the car and walk on the grass or driveway (preferred surface) to the appointment. When I notice something out of the ordinary, I know to devote attention to that spot during the session.
So, a marine sniper, a dog show judge and a canine massage practitioner, as well as veterinarians, look for what they expect not to see, for that gives them information about where to be cautious.
A marine sniper, a dog show judge, a canine massage practitioner, and a veterinarian have to learn this skill while Fido knows it instinctively.
Dogs see well in low light (at night, dawn and dusk), better than we do but dogs see colors less well (fewer cones than rods in their eyes). Dogs are also more attracted to movement: they may not see someone standing in the park 300 meters away UNTIL he moves. Dogs ‘scan their sector’ and focus in on movement – that which is sudden and out of the ordinary. We, on the other hand, see objects better that stand out (different color, e.g.) from the background and have to learn to scan our sector.
Dogs have a lot to teach us. What has your dog taught you lately?


EverythingDogBlog #9
(Holly, Swimming with a Tennis Ball/Holly, After Swimming with a Tennis Ball/Holly's Magic Chair of Tennis Balls at Camp Goldstock)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson (note: This blog was written primarily by a friend of mine, who belonged to Holly, the golden.)
In memory of Holly, golden retriever (9 Sep 1993 – 27 Aug 2009)
Dear golden friends from Camp Goldstock,
Please visit Holly’s Magic Chair. This is the story of how it came to be.
Last summer (2008) when we returned from Goldstock (a camp mostly for golden retrievers and their people – www.goldstockcamp.com ), I told my neighbor about the great time our dog Holly had playing ball and racing down to the lake. She had just been diagnosed with spinal neuropathy but she acted like she was 2 when she saw that lake, not 15!
My neighbor at home often sees tennis balls in the retention pond at the high school when she takes her early morning walk. She said she would gather some up for Holly. 
So, every day since last fall when Holly went out for her morning walk at about 7:30 a.m., there on the chair on our front porch would be a gift of one, two, or sometimes a jackpot of tennis balls. 
Holly would sniff each one, smile as if to say, "Wow this is such a magic chair!" and after her walk, on the way back into the house, she would grab one to add to her pile of treasures that she has been collecting since we adopted her at age 11. 
As the year went on I started putting the extra tennis balls from the Magic Chair into a bag in the garage for the next Goldstock camp. 
Last week Holly stopped checking the chair. 
Her thoughts were focused on how to get up in the morning and lie down for a nap and if she could manage to eat breakfast. After all, she was 15 years old!
Her days of tennis balls were behind her and she earned her wings just short of her 16th birthday and her second trip to Goldstock.
Holly would like you to play with her tennis balls from the Magic Chair you pass on the way to the lake at Goldstock. All she asks is that as you throw out the first ball you say, "Here Holly, go get it. This one’s for you!" She’ll be right there.

With Love,
Holly’s Mom
(Photos courtesy of ROsman)



EverythingDogBlog #8

Why shop at an Independent Pet Store?
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
(I have just returned from a working vacation – out of town for about a month, attending advanced canine massage courses in Ohio and dog camps in Pennsylvania and New Hampshire where I presented a canine massage class - but more about those topics later.)
Q: Why shop at an independent pet store?
Three independent pet product stores currently make their homes in the Columbia area: Dogs and Company near the main post office, Bark! near 32 and 108 (and other locations), and the new My Pet Store And More on route 40.
For a wonderfully stocked selection with a variety of mostly dog, but also cat, bird, horse, gerbil/hamster, and fish supplies (or special order what you need at a competitive price), try an independent pet store.
But more than that is the knowledge and experience of those who work in independent pet stores. They know pets and weren’t just hired last week.
1. Dogs and Company (formerly near Route 100) (www.dogsandcompany.com, “Catering to Canines”) has had the unique niche of being The Place To Go for the past 14 years for a self-service dog wash! How cool is that!
D & C specializes in premium and natural dog food (“Nutrition is the foundation of your pet’s health”) and carries a huge selection of raw and dehydrated food, as well as many excellent enrichment toys.
Dog rescues and meetings are regularly hosted. In addition, Terry Lewis, owner, recently opened the unique Canine Café and serves coffee, tea and hot cocoa to the human half of the team.
At Dogs and Company, you can even schedule an acupuncture appointment for your best friend!
2. Bark! (www.barknatural.com) for dogs, cats and small animals has recently expanded to 5 stores but the original Bark! is right here in Clarksville.
Bark! has a super selection of premium dog food (“Pawsitive Petfood”) and numerous stylish and ‘green’ collars, leashes, and enrichment toys. Bark! also hosts rescue and educational events weekly (I even presented a canine massage seminar there!) and has been a leader in the green community since 2005.
3. With 22 years in the pet supply business, Chris Houck, of the newly opened My Pet Store And More (mypetstoreandmore.com) on Route 40 is a wealth of information on products and food for dogs, cats, birds, fish, reptiles, gerbils/hamsters – you name it! My Pet Store And More also hosts rescue events and other animal-related drop-in functions like the future Ask-The-Trainer and Canine First Aid sessions.
If they don’t have it, Chris can get it for you!
He is perhaps the most knowledgeable pet supply person I have ever met! Stop by My Pet Store And More and try to stump him sometime!
Q: What does an independent pet supply store have that your average pet store or superstore doesn’t? Knowledge, built up over years of experience. And premium pet food, unique and green items - well worth the trip to become a regular!
So, what good is an independent pet supply store? A darn good product selection and great deals (without selling pets themselves), high-quality items, educational events and fun dog rescue days.
What more could you ask for?

(Photos courtesy of the stores)



EverythingDogBlog #7
EverythingDogBloWhat's in a name anyway?
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
What's in a name, anyway?
A rose is a rose is a rose, right? What ever happened to all the Rovers and Rustys and Chiefs and Fidos and Spots and Patches and Kings of yesteryear? Now our dogs are named Hannah and Sam and, . . .  ahem! -  Cuddles. (Well, better to be a Cuddles than a Puddles.)
According to BARk magazine (http://www.thebark.com/) which writes that according to petfinder.com, the top ten canine names of 2011 were mostly human (why am I not surprised?) and included Max, Daisy, Bella, Lucy, Molly, Charlie, Jack, and Sadie, rounded out by two monikers that can belong to either humans or canines - Buddy and Rocky.
Of course you know that there are only three possible names for a dog:
1. Beethoven, so you can say, "Roll over, Beethoven!"
2. Achilles so you can say "Achilles! Heel!" and
3. Johann Sebastian Barque.
In my training classes, I tend to call all the dogs, Sweetheart or Sweetie Pie (and call them all 'hims'). Imagine my surprise when one little one WAS actually named Sweetie Pie! Fortunately that class also had a Helix whose human was a geneticist like me. At last someone who could speak my language!
And I hear Christian Slater doesn’t have a fish called Wanda but does have a dog called Fish!
One of the families I dogsit for in Columbia even has a pooch named Poochie (how original is that?), probably named by the former child who is now a teen. . . . a real Poochie ‘Moochie.’
In the world of show dogs (think Westminster Dog Show in Madison Square Garden every February), one names a dog several times, the first of which is the kennel name (e.g., Lazyriver) followed by the dog name (Star in the Skye) for Lazyriver Star in the Skye, or Skylar/Skye for short, the call name, which should not rhyme with 'no' or 'sit' or 'stay' or 'come' or 'heel' or 'go potty' . . . . for obvious reasons.
As a matter of fact, the American Kennel Club (AKC) actually has a list of rules for naming dogs, one of which is that a name cannot be more than 30 characters long. The AKC must also approve each name and no more than 37 dogs of the same breed can share the same name. But you can give your dog a number instead of a name!
Having said all that, I want three more labs and a golden retriever since I already have their names picked out. My black labrador retriever will be called Goldie, my yellow lab will be named Spot, my chocolate lab will be Whitey and I will call my golden retriever, Blackie (or maybe Labbie). That way they will never answer to anyone else! (I can always pretend they aren't mine, too!).
I might also get a male dog (a dog) and name him Lassie, and get a female dog (a bitch) and name her Laddie. But my favorite name for a dog will forever be Deogie (D-O-G) or just, "Hey You! You in the Fur Coat!"
On the other hand, I also want a Rottweiler (a Rottie) whom I shall call Sweetums (I once had a teddy bear that I called CocoaButterHoneyBrownSugarTeddyBear) and a pit bull named Princess who shall always wear a pink collar. Except when she's wearing flowers or ribbons-and-bows.
My best buddy has a Cutie and a Chewy – easier to identify who is the canine in that family.
Or maybe I'll get a Yorkie and name her Bear! After all, aren't we programmed to live up to our names? (Which is why I changed mine! Unfortunately, people often think Skye is the dog partner of this human-canine team.)
Shown in the photo are Moose, an Old Gold, and puppy Tyson, a boxer. What a pair!
(Photo courtesy of SBrown)



EverythingDogBlog #6
(Campbell in the Driver's Seat/Maggie's Summer Cut)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
We are responsible for our dogs’ safety and well-being so we need to ‘wisen up’ during the hot, sultry ‘dog days of summer’ to keep them healthy, happy and cool canines. (The ‘dog days of summer’ were mistakenly thought by ancient Greeks and Romans to be caused by the Dog Star Sirius, the brightest star.)
Put your dog in the driver’s seat (not literally, but see photo anyway) and keep his comfort and safety in mind this summer. Our dogs want to be with us and go where we go – even to the office! But many times this time of year, it is wiser to leave them home to nap in the cool house rather than to take them to watch the kids’ soccer game unless we can be sure there is sufficient water and shade to keep them cool.
Some breeds are better suited for hot climes (Chihuahuas and other short-haired dogs) while others are better suited for cold climates (Huskies, Malamutes, etc.).
Dogs and humans regulate body temperature differently: humans by sweating all over our body and dogs by panting (ever see a dog’s tongue hanging out on hot days?) and sweating through their paw pads – a wet nose also helps to cool the body via evaporation.
To Shave or Not To Shave – Your Dog!
Hair protects, insulates, and keeps body heat in and water out. Double-coated dogs have an undercoat of secondary hairs - short, dense, thin, sometimes wavy, and soft - plus an outer coat of coarser, thicker, generally straighter, and longer primary guard hairs. The term, fur, is usually applied to these dogs and fur is shed, sometimes twice a year.
Single-coated dogs (with ‘hair,’ rather than ‘fur’) have short, dense hair and a very fine undercoat; however, both fur and hair have the same composition and considerable disagreement exists as to whether the terms are interchangeable or not.
Groomers are sometimes asked to shave a golden retriever for the summer (see photo of Maggie). A responsible groomer will decline to do so.
“Shaving can cause a dog to get sun burned and shaving doesn’t really keep a dog cool,” according to Gayle Haak, groomer for 35 years at White Birch Kennels in Pennsylvania. “A golden’s coat acts as insulation to cool him in summer (and retain body heat during winter).”
Sometimes Haak will thin out a dog’s coat so it is not so thick. She also instructs owners how to properly comb a dog to get rid of a lot of the heavy undercoat.
And some groomers will shave the tummy area only – a reasonable compromise.
Sunburn and Heatstroke
A conditioner and canine sunblock can be a good idea if a dog spends a lot of time in the sun or water. It is also crucial to keep an eye on your best friend in the water because he can suffer from heat stroke even while swimming. Dogs have even been known to die from ingesting too much water when in the water.
Protect those Paw Pads during the Summer, too!
We humans wear shoes or at least flipflops so we may not be aware how hot the asphalt can get but our dogs know. Asphalt can actually burn the pads on their feet pretty badly and cause other damage. A human wouldn't think of walking barefoot on asphalt for long so why would you want your dog to? Just plain old common sense. 
Even wood decking can become very hot (and now there are new, hotter fake-wood decks to be aware of).
Beware of Dogs in Parked Cars
And finally, be very cautious about leaving your dog in the car while you run into the store for ‘just a minute.’ It can take ‘just a minute’ for a car to become overheated, even in the shade if the temperature is over 72 degrees, even with the windows cracked. Call the Howard County Police Department if you see a dog in a parked car or at least notify the manager of the store. You can also call Animal Control at 410-313-2780.
According to ‘State Laws that Protect Animals Left in Parked Vehicles’ at http://www.animallaw.info/articles/qvuspetsincars.htm, Maryland is one of 14 states with a law protecting dogs and cats in parked vehicles: humans are prohibited from leaving dogs or cats in a confined vehicle. Police and animal control officers are permitted to use force to remove the animal if necessary.
So, it is up to you to protect your dog’s health and safety in these ‘dog days of summer.’ Just do it: he’s worth it! After all, he is your best friend!

(Photo courtesy VSalico)

 Leave Your No's at Home When Training Your Dog




EverythingDogBlog #6
(Campbell in the Driver's Seat/Maggie's Summer Cut)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
We are responsible for our dogs’ safety and well-being so we need to ‘wisen up’ during the hot, sultry ‘dog days of summer’ to keep them healthy, happy and cool canines. (The ‘dog days of summer’ were mistakenly thought by ancient Greeks and Romans to be caused by the Dog Star Sirius, the brightest star.)
Put your dog in the driver’s seat (not literally, but see photo anyway) and keep his comfort and safety in mind this summer. Our dogs want to be with us and go where we go – even to the office! But many times this time of year, it is wiser to leave them home to nap in the cool house rather than to take them to watch the kids’ soccer game unless we can be sure there is sufficient water and shade to keep them cool.
Some breeds are better suited for hot climes (Chihuahuas and other short-haired dogs) while others are better suited for cold climates (Huskies, Malamutes, etc.).
Dogs and humans regulate body temperature differently: humans by sweating all over our body and dogs by panting (ever see a dog’s tongue hanging out on hot days?) and sweating through their paw pads – a wet nose also helps to cool the body via evaporation.
To Shave or Not To Shave – Your Dog!
Hair protects, insulates, and keeps body heat in and water out. Double-coated dogs have an undercoat of secondary hairs - short, dense, thin, sometimes wavy, and soft - plus an outer coat of coarser, thicker, generally straighter, and longer primary guard hairs. The term, fur, is usually applied to these dogs and fur is shed, sometimes twice a year.
Single-coated dogs (with ‘hair,’ rather than ‘fur’) have short, dense hair and a very fine undercoat; however, both fur and hair have the same composition and considerable disagreement exists as to whether the terms are interchangeable or not.
Groomers are sometimes asked to shave a golden retriever for the summer (see photo of Maggie). A responsible groomer will decline to do so.
“Shaving can cause a dog to get sun burned and shaving doesn’t really keep a dog cool,” according to Gayle Haak, groomer for 35 years at White Birch Kennels in Pennsylvania. “A golden’s coat acts as insulation to cool him in summer (and retain body heat during winter).”
Sometimes Haak will thin out a dog’s coat so it is not so thick. She also instructs owners how to properly comb a dog to get rid of a lot of the heavy undercoat.
And some groomers will shave the tummy area only – a reasonable compromise.
Sunburn and Heatstroke
A conditioner and canine sunblock can be a good idea if a dog spends a lot of time in the sun or water. It is also crucial to keep an eye on your best friend in the water because he can suffer from heat stroke even while swimming. Dogs have even been known to die from ingesting too much water when in the water.
Protect those Paw Pads during the Summer, too!
We humans wear shoes or at least flipflops so we may not be aware how hot the asphalt can get but our dogs know. Asphalt can actually burn the pads on their feet pretty badly and cause other damage. A human wouldn't think of walking barefoot on asphalt for long so why would you want your dog to? Just plain old common sense. 
Even wood decking can become very hot (and now there are new, hotter fake-wood decks to be aware of).
Beware of Dogs in Parked Cars
And finally, be very cautious about leaving your dog in the car while you run into the store for ‘just a minute.’ It can take ‘just a minute’ for a car to become overheated, even in the shade if the temperature is over 72 degrees, even with the windows cracked. Call the Howard County Police Department if you see a dog in a parked car or at least notify the manager of the store. You can also call Animal Control at 410-313-2780.
According to ‘State Laws that Protect Animals Left in Parked Vehicles’ at http://www.animallaw.info/articles/qvuspetsincars.htm, Maryland is one of 14 states with a law protecting dogs and cats in parked vehicles: humans are prohibited from leaving dogs or cats in a confined vehicle. Police and animal control officers are permitted to use force to remove the animal if necessary.
So, it is up to you to protect your dog’s health and safety in these ‘dog days of summer.’ Just do it: he’s worth it! After all, he is your best friend!



EverythingDogBlog #5
(The Nose Knows!)
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
My first university teaching job was in Thailand, the land of ‘Sanuk.’ Sanuk means ‘fun.’ My teaching philosophy was to make my classes fun: if they were fun, the students would come: if they came, they would learn.
My philosophy is the same for dog training classes: make it fun for both members of the team - the dog and the human.
The most common word to come out of the mouths of many dog-frustrated folks is “No!” Some dogs even think their name is No!
So, I ask my clients to leave their no’s at home when they come to a dog manners class. We use primarily positive reinforcement (we do not purposely use positive punishment) which means we reward the dog when he is doing something right (and usually ignore him when he is doing something ‘wrong’). 
Instead of telling your dog, ‘No,’ when he is doing something ‘wrong,’ redirect him and give him something appropriate to do so you can praise him or give him a treat.
If the new puppy is chewing on your teenager’s tennis shoe, interrupt the deed by excitedly calling him away and giving him a stuffed Kong instead (stuffed with treats and kibble as a reward). Then put the shoe away and have a talk with your teen about puppy-proofing.
Dogs do what works for them. So, they will tend to repeat the things that get them treats. Dogs will be good if given the right environment.
Leaving your No’s at home can be hard for us humans. It is often difficult to think of another way to do something but much better for both of you in the long run. So, if it helps to put up a sign or crinkle up your ‘nose’ to remember to leave your no’s at home, I won’t tell! But your dog will thank you for it!
(Photo courtesy of StockFreeImages.com)

Thankful Paws: Will Love for Food




EverythingDogBlog #4
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS 
What are thankful paws?
‘Thankful Paws’ is a foodbank for pets living with seniors, the disabled and our veterans who need assistance to care for their best friends. In just its first three months in operation, Thankful Paws has aided more than a hundred of Maryland’s best friends by distributing essential food and supplies and by serving as a resource center for people and pets in need.
This Saturday you can find out more. Stop by the recently opened “My Pet Store and More” in Ellicott City (9469 Baltimore National Pike/Route 40, 410-465-0594), from 10:30 – 1:30 to meet Thankful Paws founder Lynn Molnar and her golden retriever Hero and learn what you can do to help dogs and their people who need ”just a little bit.” Perhaps you can also bring a toy or leash to offer the worthy canines (or purchase one in the store).  A raffle drawing will be held at 1:30 pm.
“Thankful Paws helps take the financial burden off the minds of pet owners in need by providing food and supplies for their loyal, faithful and loving pets. You don’t have to abandon a pet or find a new home for your faithful companion due to lack of money. Thankful Paws can help through its base of generous donors,” according to Molnar, inspirational founder.
“We understand the love and attachment everyone has for their loyal buddy. It is our hope that no pets go hungry or are abandoned.”       
For more information, visit www.thankfulpaws.org. The paws will thank you!

Walkies, Anyone?





EverythingDogBlog #3
EverythingDogBlog 
by Skye Anderson, MS
How do you and your dog go for a walk? Does he pull you because he is in a hurry to see what’s up ahead? If so, he is taking YOU for a walk. Are you pulling him along because he stops to sniff too often? If so, you are taking him for a walk. Or are the two of you basically walking together, enjoying each other’s company, with Fido within a 4-6 foot radius of you? If so, you are walking together. Or is Fido by your left leg all the time, heeling, as you walk briskly along?
Heeling is not necessary for an enjoyable walk. As a matter of fact, I don’t even teach Heeling in my dog training classes. Instead, I teach Loose-Leash Walking. I don’t care where your dog is (in front of you, behind you or by your side, left or right), as long as he is fairly close and Not Pulling. A term I use for Loose-Leash Waling (LLW) is J-Walking because the leash is not taut but looks a J.
Do you walk your dog just so he can ‘do his business’ and when he does, do you turn around and head for home? Perhaps your dog will catch on to this and delay doing his business to get a longer walk.
But this is not a blog on how to walk your dog other than to ask, Do you take your cell phone with you? A good idea, just in case you need to call for help for you or someone else. But NOT a good idea if you are on the phone for the duration of the walk and not paying attention to your dog, your best friend. Your dog could pick up something and devour it and it may not be what you want him to eat (this is more common at night when you can’t see as good as your dog can smell).
On the other hand, it is perfectly all right to carry on a conversation with Fido!
One purpose of a walk is to bond together, you and your dog, to enjoy seeing and smelling the same things. A lilac bush in bloom (for you), an overflowing garbage can or a fire hydrant (for your dog).
Perhaps you stop to chat with another person out for a walk.  What does your dog do? Chances are he is at the end of the leash trying to get to that enticing smell that you don’t know exists but is just out of his reach. You yank on the leash, trying to get him back to you.
Why not put Fido in a Sit or a Down while you chitchat? This is a great opportunity for you to pet him and teach him a Settle. That way he can’t get into trouble and if you are petting him, chances are that he likes it!
You can also step on the leash to keep Rover from roving too far! He will then mostl likely sit or lie down.
I can’t keep my hands off any dog – perhaps because I have been doing canine massage for about 10 years. But I have never noticed this in anyone else until I attended the Pets on Wheels event at the state fairgrounds earlier this month. April from the Department of Natural Resources gave a presentation with her black lab, Bear, and showed us how he finds things with his nose. But, before the demonstration, April talked about Bear’s (and her) training as a team and all during the presentation, she would reach down and pet Bear’s head or ear. I could just feel the warm glow she transmitted to her canine partner and noticed that he would look up at her raptly. What a team!
I believe this was the first time I have been aware of anyone else making constant contact with his or her dog, like I do. I challenge you to do the same when you and Fido go for a walk. Let us know how it works out! And how many others you see in good relationships with dogs!


Pets on Wheels, A Hot Weekend!




EverythingDogBlog #2

The weather outside was frightful but the weather inside was delightfully air-conditioned during a recent record heat-setting weekend. The fundays for Pets on Wheels (www.petsonwheels.org) at the State Fairgrounds in Timonium were howlingly successful and, even though the 7th annual fundraising outdoor dog walk itself was cancelled, pledges still mounted for this worthy cause, along with the outside temperature! Steve Lesser garnered the most pledges and, for his efforts, won a canine portrait by local artist Sherry Kendall of Wagging Tail Portraits (www.waggingtailportraits.com)
People and their dogs stayed all day to eat (fresh lemonade and popcorn, canine ice-cream by Howard County’s own Tiki’s Playhouse [www.tikisplayhouse.com] and plenty of canine treats, even a beer wagon!), attend fun classes (Knitting with Dog Hair and Search And Rescue were two well-attended talks), watch the dog sport of Flyball hosted by Oriole Dog Training Club, receive a canine kiss at the Canine Kissing Booth (my personal favorite!), have a stylist dress their dogs (optional) for a professional photograph, and much more!
Three dog artists had booths as well as a professional dog photographer!
A working dog from the Department of Natural Resources, black Labrador Retriever “Bear,” demonstrated his life-saving skills for us. And during the ‘Sammy Spinning’ (Samoyed hair) presentation, humans tried out a real spinning wheel. Another Flyball competition will be held at the Howard County Fairgrounds on Halloween weekend, so stay tuned if you missed this new sport at the Pets on Wheels weekend.
Pets on Wheels has provided “friendly pet visits to help lick loneliness since 1982.“ Put the Pets on Wheels Weekend on your calendar for next summer (and the World of Pets weekend also at the state fairgrounds in January). I’ll see you and your dog there!
(photo courtesy of Jen Pawloski)

Pets on Wheels at Maryland State Fairgrounds




 EverythingDogBlog #1

This blog first appeared on ColumbiaPatch.com on July 3, 2012.

Bring your dog to the state fairgrounds on July 7-8 for loads of fun!
EverythingDogBlog
by Skye Anderson, MS
Welcome to Everything Dog! We will be sharing news about upcoming local dog events and seminars/workshops, reviewing past ones, answering training and behavior questions, recommending great dog books and just about ‘Everything Dog’!
Pets on Wheels - Annual Dog-a-Thon and Pet-a-paw-looza at State Fairgrounds
Wondering what to do the weekend after the Fourth? Wonder no more. Wander on up to the Maryland State Fairgrounds (free parking) in Timonium. Take you favorite pupster and the kids to the 7th annual Pets on Wheels Dog-a-Thon and Pet-a-paw-looza, Saturday, July 7, from 10 am to 8 pm, and Sunday, July 8, from 11 am to 7 pm.
The weather promises to be perfect – indoors with air-conditioning, though the dog walk fundraiser will be outdoors (register online and start your fundraising at www.petsonwheels.org).
Pets on Wheels’ people and their friendly pets visit individuals requiring the support of an institutional setting who need their days brightened. Volunteer dog teams call on Maryland nursing homes, assisted living facilities, hospitals and libraries (to read with children). The not-for-profit organization has been helping ‘lick’ loneliness since 1982. For more information, see www.petsonwheels.org or, in Howard County, call Ingrid Glysteen at 410-313-7461.  
The canine extravaganza will feature sporty dog demos, ravishing raffles, a fun fundraising walk, precious puparrazzi photos, stimulating speakers, crazy cool contests, a silent auction, fabulous food, a beer garden (complete with foam), and vendors galore! So much to do that you can spend the entire weekend!
Watch your first Flyball Tournament – see dogs jump over hurdles in a relay race, grab a tennis ball and race back to the next dog on their team. Dogs from greyhounds to dachshunds will be there for the petting. For a complete schedule of the events and admission discounts, go to www.petsonwheels.org.